Where is Jesus?

I was invited to an ongoing outreach training seminar a while back. It sounded like a denominational program, held in a denominational building, with the goal of converting others to our denominational beliefs. Even though an old friend was heading it up, I had less than no interest. Despite holding the denominational beliefs as true, I often severely disagree with the sub-culture, and attending a planning committee to multiply that sub-culture in our community was not top of my list for use of my free time.

Why are we so driven to convert others to Jesus if He’s so impotent that He can’t accomplish anything in our own lives?  Why do we even need Jesus if our primary focus is on working harder, being good, and making right choices? Oh, I’m sure none of us would actually say we don’t need Jesus, but we live it all the time. How often in response to a guilty conscience do we turn toward ourselves instead of Jesus? More often our thoughts probably go something like “I should really stop being so fill-in-the-blank. I should try harder at that next time.”  Where is the power of God in that? How has Jesus impacted your life there? He gave you a standard you feel obligated to live up to, but other religions or philosophies can do that. What’s so special about Jesus if all He’s done is given you a behavior goal to work toward?   Where is Jesus in self-improvement and good living?

We may for a time convince ourselves and others that trying hard to be good is resulting in success. But that is not reality. We cannot fix our sin problem by trying hard. It’s a convoluted, dysfunctional journey when we try to play the role of God in our lives. At some point we will each get sufficient  evidence to realize that we are broken and in need of Jesus. But if our beliefs have taught us that people who are really saved are not broken, and if we hold our salvation and beliefs tightly, then we will not be able to admit our own brokenness. We become narcissistic and victim-driven in our thinking and look for explanations for our hardships outside of ourselves. Our own beliefs that could have kept us humbly at the feet of Jesus instead cause us to cling more strongly to our self-righteousness. Being broken is risking too much. Where is Jesus in the charade?

Church, your talk is often focused on how much the unchurched need Jesus and the truth. You don’t talk nearly as often about the need for Jesus’ power in the lives of church members. Sure, you’ll say you need His help and guidance so you can do a better job at converting them, but generally that’s as far as it goes. Perhaps those on the outside of the church need Jesus, while those on the inside are only needed by Jesus to do His work. Your words may say otherwise, but over time the cultural atmosphere says the saved don’t need Jesus like the unsaved need Jesus. So what’s wrong with me when I fail? Why do I need Jesus so much? Am I actually one of them and not one of us? Maybe I don’t belong. Where is Jesus in this self-righteous club?

imag0172

I didn’t start attending a house church community so I could be on the cutting-edge of evangelism.  My focus wasn’t on reaching a new group of people to save or serving as a missionary in my city. I went to be surrounded by others who admit they stumble as I do, so I know I’m not alone. I went to be with those who want to be reminded of how good Jesus is when they forget, and who will do the same for me when I forget. I went to find Jesus, because I need Him. Oh, I’ve stumbled there, too. I’ve gotten wrapped up at times in the process and thought the key was in the “how” and not the “Who”. “It” has been so much more deeply ingrained in me than “He” has. But He has touched my heart in a way that “it” never could.  There is no deep abiding power in a list of beliefs. The power lies in knowing in Whom we believe.

Jesus is there.

His power lies in the impact of His grace that removes my need to prove myself to Him. In my weakness, I am enough because He is enough. His power shines in His omnipotence that lets me rest and not fight to control. He is able to control all things. His power is in His goodness and glory that fulfills my cravings, allowing God to become bigger and other people smaller. He frees me of my idols. His power will naturally bring my behavior into alignment with His will, not because He forces me, nor because I’m working hard at it, but because His love draws it out of me. His yoke is easy.

Jesus is there. 

I have found His covering righteousness shining in the writings of Ty Gibson and heard His grace and justice in the preaching of David Asscherick. I have surprisingly been drawn to His goodness in the words of Ellen White. And I found Him this week at that outreach training seminar, held in a denominational building with a distinctly denominational group, where we decided the most important outreach focus for next year is for each one of us to grow in our personal relationship with Jesus and to rely on Him daily. The power is in the relationship and it is through our abiding in His power that others will come to know Him.

Jesus is there. 

 

Advertisements
Previous Post
Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: